REDESIGNING PEDAGOGY

International Conference
2nd to 4th June 2015

Held in conjunction with

11th International CitizED Conference &
Arts, Humanities and Literature Conference 2015

Arts, Humanities and Literature Conference 2015

4 June 2015

Live(d) Experiences: Imagination, Wonder and Spaces of IM/possibilities

  • What is the role of the Arts, Humanities and Literature in an increasingly multimodal, multi-mediated, and multicultural world?
  • In what ways can Arts, Humanities and Literature enable students to engage with wider communities, both within a nation and more globally, beginning at the classroom?
  • How do we begin to prepare students for contemporary global issues such as poverty, human trafficking, war and conflict and climate change?
  • How do we incite students' sense of wonder and justice to imagine alternative spaces of im/possibilities that are grounded in both the local and the global?
  • What kinds of pedagogical approaches can we adopt to instruct and inspire students to be critical and empathetic citizens in a constantly changing world?

In this inaugural Arts, Humanities and Literature Conference 2015, we seek to confront these questions and extend teachers' understandings of what it means to be a citizen of a world in ways both rooted and cosmopolitan, and to open up pedagogical possibilities through engagement with the world we live in. The focus on live/d experiences locates our understanding of the world in actual sites of practice at individual, community, national and global levels, and points to the interconnectivity between the individual and the collective, the local and the global, the personal and the political. We discuss the key place of the Arts, Humanities and Literature in helping students make these connections among the different spaces they inhabit, and to imagine alternative spaces for transformation and action in their everyday lives.


This special one-day event, held in conjunction with the Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference 2015, invites speakers and participants - as creators, performers and consumers - to consider dynamic spaces of im/possibilities through interactive panel discussions and workshops.These are organized around the following four key strands to encourage in-depth exploration of content and pedagogical issues that are essential for 21st century education.

  1. Engaging students in 21stcentury global issues;
  2. Critical awareness of power, place and pedagogy;
  3. Transmedia navigation with youths in the 21stcentury; and
  4. Crossing boundaries: Inter- and trans-disciplinary education.

Participants can choose to sign up for the Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference 2015 and indicate their desire to attend the Arts, Humanities and Literature Conference 2015 OR sign up for a one-day session. Registration will be open from 1 Dec 2014. Please register at the conference website at http//:conference.nie.edu.sg


Keynote Speakers

Erica McWilliam

Professor Erica McWilliam is an internationally recognised scholar in the field of pedagogy with a particular focus on preparing young peoplefor 'over the horizon' futures. In her numerous presentations to educational leaders, teachers, parents and students, she elaborates on the challenges faced by all those who are seeking to ensure that our young people will live, learn and earn well in this demanding century. In particular, she stresses the importance of providing 'low threat, high challenge' learning environments that assist young people to welcome error and the instructive complications of unfamiliarity and complexity.She has been instrumental in directing the Creative Workforce 2.0 Research Program in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation since 2006, and has also performed professorial duties as an educational researcher at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. She is a Fellow of the Australian Council of Education, an Honorary Fellow of the Australia Council of Educational Leadership and an Associate Fellow of the Learning and Teaching Council of Australia. A recent sole-authored book, 'The Creative Workforce: How to launch young people into high flying futures', is published by UNSW Press, and number of her more recent papers are available on her website - http://www.ericamcwilliam.com.au/. Her most recent book, Educating Girls,was published last year with the Queensland University Press and Brisbane Girls Grammar School.

Format of the Arts, Humanities and Literature Conference 2015

There will be panel sessions, followed by workshopsduring the conference.

Panel Sessions: Panellists of three to four will engage in an interactive panel session, led by a discussant. Each panellist will have 15 minutes to share their thoughts on the issue at hand, and there will be 30 minutes for Q & A. This session may be re-formatted depending on the need of each strand. Each panel session will host about 80 participants.

Workshops: Facilitators will share innovative pedagogical ideas for implementation in the classroom. The focus is on helping teachers see how they can incorporate the larger issues discussed in their classrooms. Each workshop will host between 25 to 30 participants.

Strand Overviews

These panel sessions and workshops are organized around the following four key strands to encourage in-depth exploration of content and pedagogical issues that are essential for 21st century education.

  1. Engaging students in 21stcentury global issues;
  2. Critical awareness of power, place and pedagogy;
  3. Transmedia navigation with youths in the 21stcentury; and
  4. Crossing boundaries: Inter- and trans-disciplinary education.

Strand One: Engaging Students in 21st Century Global Issues

What kinds of issues should and can students be exposed to in the 21st century? What can the Arts, Humanities and Literature contribute to students' understanding of pressing 21st century global issues? How do we teach these central and possibly controversial issues in the Arts, Humanities and Literature classrooms? How do we prepare students to be citizens in a world that is both local and global?

In this strand, we encourage participants to examine key global issues such as human trafficking, poverty, disabilities and the environment. We consider the significant role of Arts, Humanities and Literature educators in exposing students to theseglobal issues. Through the panel sessions, participants will expand their understanding of what it means to engage students in meaningful discussion and action with regard to these key issues in the 21st century. Workshop sessions will focus on various innovative pedagogical possibilities for engaging students in 21st century global issues.

Strand Two: Critical Awareness of Power, Place and Pedagogy

Place-based pedagogy conceptualizes teaching and learning in a way that emphasizes people's relationships to their environment; yet, our understanding of place is informed by the power politics that render some places or spaces more visible than others, whether in conversations about conservation, education or in texts, both printed and visual. As educators, how do we connect students' learning to place? What hidden spaces and conversations do we need to unearth and foreground in our classrooms? What is the role of the Arts, Humanities and Literature in bringing place to life? And in keeping places alive? What is the politics of place that students must necessarily engage in as 21st century citizens? In this strand, we focus on conversations about places and spaces that matter in the Singapore context, and share strategies for making the politics of place central in the curriculum.

Strand Three: Transmedia Navigation with Youths in the 21st Century

In an increasingly networked society of media flows, our youths are engaged with multiple forms of media on a daily basis. How can we engage with our N-generation students who are plugged into multiple forms of viewing, reading, writing and listening? What can we do to invite them to become critical readers/viewers of the constant flow of information they have access to? How can we, as educators, rethink the way we navigate media and the worlds of our youths in order to better learn and better teach? In this strand, we examine the participatory culture of youths and the many forms of media available in order to re-envision teaching and learning in a networked world. We look at the intersection between physical and virtual spaces to rethink how we can meaningfully engage students in 21st century issues through multiple media forms.

Strand 4: Crossing Boundaries in Education

While we are all too often engaged in teaching within subject and disciplinary boundaries, looking beyond disciplinary boundaries and thinking about solutions from all angles is very much part of real world living. What does it mean to take an interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary approach to education? What happens when we apply different disciplinary lenses to a single problem? How do we help students make connections among the different disciplines and to their everyday lives? How can we move beyond disciplinary boundaries to teach students to look at issues and problems insightfully? In this strand, we examine the potential of boundary crossing in Arts, Humanities and Literature education.