Keynote Speakers


Professor David Carr

Professor David Carr

University of Birmingham (UK)

David Carr is Emeritus Professor at the University of Edinburgh and currently Professor of Ethics and Education at the University of Birmingham (UK) Jubilee Centre for the Study of Character and Virtues. He is the author of three books and numerous philosophical and educational papers and editor or co-editor of several major collections of essays on philosophy and ethics of education. Of his numerous philosophical and educational papers and book chapters, many have been concerned with aspects of virtue ethics and, more recently, with the value of art and literature for the education of moral character. He enjoys reading and music.

Title: Moral Character and Virtue in Education and Public Life

Over the past five years, the University of Birmingham Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues has established a global reputation for the academic study and practical promotion of moral character in contexts of education, professional practice and general public life. Following some attention to the neo-Aristotelian basis of Jubilee research – particularly to such key notions as virtue and the practical wisdom of Aristotle’s phronesis – this presentation will explore the significance of moral character for the professional education of teachers and the moral education of school pupils, with specific reference to such recent work in British schools as the ‘Knightly virtues’ project.

Professor Robert Root-Bernstein

Professor Kim Sung-il

Professor Kim Sung-il

Korea University

Sung-il Kim is a Professor of Educational Psychology and the Director of Brain and Motivation Research Institute (bMRI) at Korea University. His recent research interests revolve around interdisciplinary approach on interest and motivation, including neuroeducational approaches on interest and motivation, motivationally adaptive tutoring agent, and interest-based learning model. He has over 90 scholarly publications and received the ‘Distinguished Teaching Awards’ twelve consecutive times from Korea University, the 'Edwin B. Newman Award for Excellence in Research' from American Psychological Association/Psi Chi, and the ‘Award for outstanding contribution’ from Korean Educational Psychology Association.

Title: Interest-based Learning: A New pedagogical framework for future education

People learn best when they are interested. Given the importance of interest and curiosity in the new era of fourth industrialized revolution, it is essential to design the learning environment fun and exciting. Interest can be parsed into three sub-processes, a process of generating situational interest, developing and regulating individual interest. I propose an interest-based learning framework in terms of learner characteristics, learning material, learning activity, and learning assessment. The educational implications of interest-based learning will be discussed in relation to individualized, autonomous, and ubiquitous learning.

Professor Kim Sung-il

Professor Robert Root-Bernstein

Professor Robert Root-Bernstein

Michigan State University

Robert Root-Bernstein is a scientist, humanist, and artist at Michigan State University. He earned his A.B. in Biochemistry and a Ph. D. in History of Science from Princeton University. He then did his post-doctoral research in Theories in Biology at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. A MacArthur Fellowship (1981-1986) encouraged his multidisciplinary activities. He is currently a Professor of Physiology at Michigan State University where he studies the evolution of metabolic control systems, autoimmune diseases, drug development, and the creative process in the sciences and arts. He exhibits his artwork both in group and solo shows and collaborates with the transmedia artist AdamW. Brown (http://adamwbrown.net).

Bob has written four books, including Discovering (nominated for 1990 L. A. Times Best Book of the Year) and, with Michele Root-Bernstein, Sparks of Genius (which won Korean Book of the Year when translated in 2009). He is currently at work on Modern Leonardos, which explores artists and musicians as scientists and inventors. In addition to being on the editorial boards of several scientific journals, Bob is an editor for LEONARDO, the journal of The International Society for Science, Technology and the Arts, for whom he edits a regular section on ArtScience.

Title: Teaching Creativity in the Classroom

Creative thinking synthesizes previously disparate things in novel and effective ways. Synthesis transcends disciplinary boundaries and requires the development and practice of “tools for thinking” that are universally applicable to any subject. Effective synthesis requires that a creative product address a recognizable problem. Problem discovery, in turn, requires cultivation of a questioning mentality through an ignorance-based curriculum. Classroom creativity therefore grows out of a pedagogical focus on how knowledge is created by whom rather than on what we know.

Professor Robert Root-Bernstein

Professor Robert Root-Bernstein

Professor Clare Kosnik

University of Toronto (OISE/UT)

Clare Kosnik is Director of the Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study at the Ontario Institute for Study in Education, University of Toronto (OISE/UT). She teaches in the graduate program courses on teacher education and in literacy methods courses in the pre-service program. She has won awards for her teaching, research, and doctoral supervision. Professor Kosnik has held a number of leadership positions: Director of the Master of Teaching program, Director of the Elementary Preservice Program, and Director of Teachers for a New Era (at Stanford University). Her area of research is teacher education which she has systematically studied. She has published over 10 books and dozens of refereed journal articles, books chapters, and conference paperson teacher education. She is now conducting a large-scale study of 28 literacy/English teacher educators in four countries and a longitudinal study of 40 teachers over 12 years.

Title: A Teacher Education Program Housed with a Lab School: The Value of a Shared Vision and "Space"

How can we improve teaching? How can we improve teacher education? These two questions are often considered separately yet Goodlad(1994) argued long ago that the two must go hand-in-hand. This presentation will present findings from a study of teachers whose teacher education program was fully integrated with a Lab school for children. It shows the short- and long-term impact on the graduates of this innovative model.

Professor Clare Kosnik

Guidelines on Abstract Submission

Follow us on social media for instant updates!

Conference Information

Venue: National Institute of Education, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616
An institute of
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Back To Top